John F. Kennedy

John F. Kennedy
Efforts and courage are not enough without purpose and direction. Discuss John F. Kennedy

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
To know, to esteem, to love, and then to part,Makes up life’s tale to many a feeling heart! Discuss Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Herman Melville

Herman Melville
No man can ever feel his own identity aright except his eyes be closed; as if darkness were indeed the proper element of our essences, though light be more congenial to our clayey part. Discuss Herman Melville

Wilkie Collins

Wilkie Collins
One of our first amusements as children (if we have any imagination at all) is to get out of our own characters, and to try the characters of other personages as a change—to be fairies, to be queens, to be anything, in short, but what we really are. Discuss Wilkie Collins

George Bernard Shaw

George Bernard Shaw
A married man forms married habits and becomes dependent on marriage just as a sailor becomes dependent on the sea. Discuss George Bernard Shaw

Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling
There is sorrow enough in the natural wayFrom men and women to fill our day;But when we are certain of sorrow in store,Why do we always arrange for more? Discuss Rudyard Kipling

Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott
Let us not tire of a good work, hard though it be and wearisome; think of the many little hearts that in their sorrow look to us for help. Discuss Louisa May Alcott

Poem of the day – HER "Last Poems" by Emily Dickinson

Poem of the day - HER "Last Poems" by Emily Dickinson
HER Last Poems–Poets ended,Silver perished with her tongue,Not on record bubbled otherFlute, or Woman, so divine;Not unto its Summer morningRobin uttered half the tune–Gushed too free for the adoring,From the Anglo-Florentine.Late the praise–‘Tis dull conferringOn a Head too high to crown,Diadem or Ducal showing,Be its Grave sufficient sign.Yet if we, no Poet’s kinsman,Suffocate with easy ...

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Harriet Beecher Stowe
Whipping and abuse are like laudanum; you have to double the dose as the sensibilities decline. Discuss Harriet Beecher Stowe

Washington Irving

Washington Irving
When friends grow cold, and the converse of intimates languishes into vapid civility and commonplace, these [books] only continue the unaltered countenance of happier days, and cheer us with that true friendship which never deceived hope nor deserted sorrow. Discuss Washington Irving